Dragon Professional

Introduction

After years of changes, upgrades and optimization patches Dragon for Mac is in a better place than ever before but are all the changes made to Dragon 6 enough to make it reliable enough to make it your go to transcribing, dictating and document editing app?  Dragon for Mac offers users a document creating and editing app using dictation that is made specifically for the Mac OS but when compared with Windows-geared voice recognition software’s how well does it hold up? Let’s find out.

Less Crashing & More Stability     

After six updates, Dragon for Mac by Nuance now finally has a version out that can be called stable. Since its launch, Dragon has been plagued with errors, crashes, and bugs which made anyone that bought it at launch feel as if bought an incomplete demo which they purchased at full price. Even Dragon 5 was a mess that could barely operate without running into some kinds of error.

Finally, with the release of Dragon 6, users have received a stable version of the application that they should’ve received at launch. Even though there have been many improvements, Dragon is still far from perfect and still has a few bugs and crashes that make it a chore to use.

Smoother & More Functional Dictation Yet Still Lacking

Mac computers have lacked fully functional dictation features that most computers with windows have which had put Mac at a disadvantage. While Dragon did try to solve this issue initially at a hefty cost, the overall functionality wasn’t on par with Windows but with the recent update all that has finally changed. With Dragon, you can dictate and edit a document quickly and easily after you have your preferences set up. While the process does sound simple on paper it takes a whole lot of getting used to.

Almost every features you can find on a Windows focused voice recognition software can be found in Dragon which considering the lack of Dictation software on the Mac makes it the best option for most people. It does feature extensive customization options that let you make your own commands along with a voice profile system.

Dragon also features a new and improved “Deep Learning” speech engine that helps train the software to get used to your dialect and accent while growing vocabulary to make dictation more precise and smooth. But, since the application relies heavily on deep learning, the chances of it being usable from the get go are extremely thin. Even during transcription, it seemed to have issues transcribing any voices that had a bit more accent to them.

Overall Opinion: is Dragon 6 for Mac worth It? 

While some bugs have been ironed out and there is a considerable boost in performance, Dragon is still far from the ideal dictating and transcribing software for Mac. At a price of $300, it’s recommended that you wait until the inevitable Dragon v7 is released because, in its current state and level of stability, Dragon is definitely not worth the price tag. 

Further information can be found at https://www.nuance.com/en-gb/dragon/dragon-for-mac/software.html

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